When Was Soccer Invented?

When Was Soccer Invented?

The origin story of the world’s most popular sport is disputed, as there is a long history of the sport growing and evolving over time. Nearly every major soccer country claims to have played a role in the invention of soccer, with Italy, England, and Greece being the main three. The most famous theory of when soccer was invented dates way back to ancient history in late 200 B.C. when the Han Dynasty in China created a game called Tsu Chu, which translates to kicking the ball. This version of soccer is vastly different than today’s game as one can imagine, and it is interesting to look at some of the differences. The most noticeable difference is the fact there were no fouls and penalties. Additionally, the nets were located around 30 feet from the ground. While there are reports of ancient Greeks inventing soccer as early as 2500 B.C, Tsu Chu is the version most similar to the sport we know and love today. 

Who Invented Soccer? 

Although the Chinese version of soccer is the earliest version of soccer most similar to how we play today, it is still enormously different and has changed a lot through the years. In the 19th century, players in England started to take the game more seriously. They developed a more well established version of the sport by creating rules to limit fouls and rough play. Other countries soon followed suit, creating teams and leagues with established rules and regulations, growing the sport of soccer into what we know today. 

What The Modern Soccer Game Looks Like Now

A typical professional soccer game is played on a 115 yard-long grass surface. There are goals at each end of the field, and although when you watch on TV they look small, they are actually 24 feet wide and 8 feet tall!

The standard modern soccer game is 90 minutes, which is split into two halves, during which both teams try to score on each other. Any player on a team of 11 players can theoretically score a goal, which is worth one point. In the regular season, games end at 90 minutes and can end in a tie. However, in some cases like the World Cup, 30 minutes of “extra time” will be added to break a tie. If the teams are still tied, it moves onto a penalty shootout.

There are a ton of other rules defining how the game is played in the modern day, including penalties for rough play, offsides, corner kicks, and many more. To monitor the gameplay and enforce the rules, there is a head referee and 2-3 assistant referees in most professional games. 

Is Soccer A Global Sport?

Soccer remains popular as ever, with over 250 million people worldwide playing it. Although most popular in Europe, Africa, and South America, there is plenty of growing interest in North America and Asia as well. Of course, soccer is referred to as football outside of North America.

FIFA has confederations around the world, for example the Asian Football Confederation and the Oceania Football Confederation. In the United States and Canada, there is Major League Soccer, or MLS.

Of course, there are many other levels of organized soccer in addition to the professional leagues. Around the world, many kids, teens, and adults play in countless different settings, both organized games and casual backyard games. Part of why it is so popular is its simple setup—you only need a soccer ball, some space, and something to mark the goals. 

Who Won The First FIFA World Cup?

FIFA was founded in 1904 and held its very first World Cup in Uruguay in July 1930.  The host nation ended up winning the inaugural competition, with Argentina, the United States, and Yugoslavia coming in 2nd, 3rd, and 4th places respectively.  

Throughout the 17-day competition, a total of 70 goals were scored, averaging about 3.89 each match. A total of 18 games were played by 13 teams. To put the growth of the sport into perspective, the latest FIFA World Cup tournaments feature 32 teams, and a total of 63 games are played. In the 2018 World Cup, 169 goals were scored. Out of the 21 World Cups that have ever been played, Brazil has won the most with five titles.

Image by SLR Jester {Image Source Here}


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